5 Best Smart Light Switches for your Smart Home.

Commanding the smart light switches in your house using just your voice is an amazing way and also save some stress for you, and also a great way to make yourself be in a smart world, at least you should try one of this smart home.

But if you already own one of the Google homes, then you don’t need to worry because here is the list of the best smart light switches to buy which are compatible with your smart home speaker.

Even though you can use the smart bulb instead but smart light switches are already a familiar format. it does needs you teach your guest how to use it, and works well with your existing light bulb.

Without wasting time let get right into it.

  1. GE In-Wall Smart Dimmer Switch (ZigBee) or Z-wave.

If you previously have a smart home hub that supports Z-Wave and/or ZigBee, GE makes a smart dimmer switch for either one of these wireless protocols, Z-Wave and ZigBee.

You can set schedules for the switches so that lights turn on and off at certain times, and depending on the hub, you can have the light switch turn on and off randomly to simulate someone being home, which is great for when you’re on vacation.

As long as the smart home hub that you’re connecting the switch to is compatible with Google Home (and most of them are), then the GE dimmer switch is compatible too. So if you want to use your voice to turn lights on, it’s literally as easy as saying, “Hey Google, turn the lights on.”

The only downside, as with the Wi-Fi option, is that it requires a neutral wire be present inside of the light switch box.

  1. Lutron Caseta Wireless Smart Lighting

“Dimmer Switch Starter Kit”

Single Pole/3-way Dimmer Switch Starter Kit, P-BDG-PKG1W-A, Works with Alexa, Apple Home Kit, and the Google Assistant Honestly, the best option no matter what the conditions are is the Lutron’s Caseta line, and a starter kit comes with the necessary hub, one smart dimmer switch, and one Pico remote, which lets you control the light switch from across the room without getting up from the couch.

Lutron invented the dimmer switch and has perfected it over the years. And now you can get one in smart form. The company’s Caseta line of smart light products uses its own proprietary RF wireless protocol instead of Wi-Fi, Z-Wave, or ZigBee, so it won’t interfere with any of your other smart home devices.

These switches can be put on a schedule or a timer, and you can even create different scenes where you can set specific brightnesses for specific switches in your house. And obviously, you can control them with your voice using your Google Home.

Perhaps the best feature, though, is that the switches don’t require a neutral wire, which isn’t always present inside of a light switch box, especially in older houses. So this makes Caseta switches a recommended buy for just about any setup.

After you set up the starter kit, you can buy add-on dimmer switches for the rest of your house for $60 each.

 

  1. A Wi-Fi Option: WeMo Dimmer Light Switch

If you’re only going to have a couple of smart light switches around the house and don’t want to mess with a hub, the WeMo Dimmer Light Switch is a good choice, and it connects directly to your Wi-Fi network.

This dimmer switch supports schedules, timers, as well as randomly turning lights on and off if you’re away on vacation to make it look like someone is home.

It works with your Google Home and can even link to IFTTT and Nest products. Plus, if you already have other WeMo devices in your home, you can use the switch to activate these other devices, which can be pretty convenient.

Unlike the Lutron Caseta switch, the WeMo Dimmer does require a neutral wire, so older homes without the neutral in the light switch box are out of luck.

 

  1. Leviton Decora

For those who have spent the scratch on Philips Hue bulbs, the Philips Hue dimmer is a handy little device. It can be used as a wireless remote or as a wall switch, but this switch doesn’t need any installation apart from peeling the covering off the adhesive on its back.

This switch works with only Hue bulbs, though it’s almost magic when it does. Just turn on the light containing the Hue bulb as you normally would (even if it’s via a traditional wall switch); then, start using the Philips dimmer, and it will automatically work. And don’t worry — there’s no interference or conflict between the Hue Dimmer and your normal wall switch. The magic in the dimmer lies in the Philips Hue Bridge, which is required ($59) for the dimmer to work and is required for any Philips Hue system.

The Philips Hue app is full of fun controls and creative themes for your Hue bulbs. You can set schedules for your Hue bulbs, which can be controlled by your voice through Amazon Alexa, Google Home and Apple Home Kit. It’s also compatible with a host other smart home platforms.

 

  1. LUTRON CASETA WIRELESS DIMMER KIT

Lutron’s smart starter kit comes with one in-wall switch, one wireless remote and one smart-bridge (hub), which can also be used to control Lutron Caseta fans and shades.

The switch itself looks hi-tech, with several buttons laid out to control the numerous options Caseta offers. Lutron has gone for function over fashion for the most part with this dimmer, as the white and grey buttons are front and centre, not hidden by touch-sensitive controls, as is the case with other dimmers in this category.

The Caseta line of switches from Lutron offers an impressive list of features: geofencing, which means your lights will automatically turn on or off when you leave or arrive at home; the ability to schedule your lights to turn on or off at particular times or days; dimming capabilities; and compatibility with a long list of smart home platforms. You can also control the system using your voice through Amazon Alexa and Google Home, among many others.

The only downside is that the switch, like all of Lutron’s products, must be linked to the Smart Bridge (you can get it packaged with the switch for $90). The bridge itself must be plugged into your router so that you can control it from your Smartphone.

 

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